Trade war tactics, Part 3: Chinese tricks against Vietnam in ancient time.

Trade war tactics, Part 3: Chinese tricks against Vietnam in ancient time.

by tonytran2015 (Melbourne, Australia).

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(Blog No. 1xx).

#trade war, #Chinese tricks, #China versus Vietnam, #export restriction, #female bufferlos, #iron plough points

Trade war tactics, Part 3: Chinese tricks against Vietnam in ancient time.

This blog describes in details the tricks employed by China against Vietnam in ancient time (from 200BC to AD1600). Those tricks include export restrictions as has been found in the letters of complaints from some Kings of Annam (ancient Vietnam, which was at times a neighbor State paying tributes to China) to the Emperor of China.

1. Restriction of exports by China in ancient time.

China is now complaining that the USA do not want to allow the export of CPU’s for the production of smart phones by Chinese company ZTE.

In ancient time, as can be found in history of Vietnam [1], and can be verified in ancient Chinese history [2], some Kings of Annam (ancient Vietnam, which was at times a neighbor State paying tributes to China) had complaint in their letters to the Emperor of China that:

a. When iron was first discovered (around 200BC), China banned the export of iron plough points to Vietnam to prevent Vietnam from being a efficient rice producer.

b. China only sold male bufferlos to Vietnam but banned the sale of female bufferlos. This makes Vietnam dependent on China for the supply of bufferlos.

2. USA restriction of export to China of CPU’s for smart phone is well justified.

China is now complaining that USA is employing a restriction of exports against Chinese smart phone company ZTE. However it should be noted that:

a. ZTE is owned by Chinese Government and is loyal to Chinese Government.

b. Smart phone technology can be adapted and used for robotic controls keeping in mind that the next World War may be a war by robots (currently known as lethal drones).

c. Chinese Information Technology companies have engaged in a number of practices which are worrying to Westerners: Making the Great Firewall, Making devices succeptible to Malwares, etc…

4. Economic is only a facet to a Perpetual War by China to conquer the whole World.

The revered, 2000 years old manual “The Art of War” by Sun Tzu is always practiced by China. It considers military attacks, foreign affairs and trades as only different facets of one single thing. (This is not much different from the view by Clausewitz[3,4,5,6]). The following shows Chinese success with its Perpetual Expansionism.

The vast area of current China is the result of such Forever Expanding policy starting from a Zhou dynasty (1046BC-256BC) with an area only comparable to Japan.

Zhou_dynasty_1000_BC Châu

Figure: The approximate territory of the Zhou dynasty in China. Drawn by Ian Kiu.The approximate territory of the Zhou dynasty in China. Drawn by Ian Kiu. Derived from China_map.png by Nat. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zhou_dynasty#/media/File:Zhou_dynasty_1000_BC.png Date 15 February 2011, Territories_of_Dynasties_in_China.gif: Albert Herrmann (1935). History and Commercial Atlas of China. Harvard University Press. from “The Chou Dynasty, 11th-9th Centuries B.C.” Author Territories_of_Dynasties_in_China.gif: Ian Kiu. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Figure: China Map, Qin State, 260BCE https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Qin_(state)#/media/File:EN-QIN260BCE.jpg , Date 31 October 2010
Source Own work, Author Philg88, Licensing
Creative Commons attribution share alike. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported, 2.5 Generic, 2.0 Generic and 1.0 Generic license.

Figure: Map of Three Kingdoms period of China, as of 262 A.D., Date1 1 August 2017, Author SY, file https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Three_Kingdoms.png. File is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license.

Figure: Map of Song Dynasty 1141, By Ian Kiu, Based on a map in Albert Herrmann (1935). History and Commercial Atlas of China, Harvard University Press , file https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jin%E2%80%93Song_Wars#/media/File:Sung_Dynasty_1141.png. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

Figure: Map of Qing Dynasty China in 1765., File: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/9c/18_century_Qing_China.png . Date 1-8-2011 Source Originally from CIA, taken from commons. Author CIA (Background map) Derivate work: User:Soewinhan. This image is a work of a Central Intelligence Agency employee, taken or made as part of that person’s official duties. As a Work of the United States Government, this image or media is in the public domain in the United States.

Figure: Map of China on a Chinese glass Globe made around the year 2000.

References:

[1]. Su Ky, Le Van Huu,

[1b] Viet Nam Su Luoc, Tran Trong Kim,

[2]. Sima Qian, Records of History by the grand historian (translated by Burton Watson), Qin Dynasty, Han Dynasty I (Rev. Ed.) and Han Dynasty II (Rev. Ed.), the Res. Cent. for Transl. The Chinese Univ. of Hong Kong and Colubia Univ. Press, Hong Kong and New York, 1961.

[3]. Sun Tzu, The Art of War. First published in Chinese before 200BC.

[4]. Carl von Clausewitz, Principles of Wars, Translated by Hans W. Gatzke, The Military Service Publishing Company, 1942.

[5]. Clausewitz, On War, Translated by Colonel James John Graham N. Trübner, London, 1873. Original is Carl von Clausewitz, Vom Kriege, Dümmlers Verlag, Berlin, 1832.

[6]. Carl von Clausewitz, Principles of Wars, The Clausewitz home page, https://www.clausewitz.com/mobile/principlesofwar.htm

[7]. https://irishinfosecnews.wordpress.com/2018/07/09/android-devices-with-pre-installed-malware-sold-in-developing-markets/

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