(WASHINGTON) JUST IN: FBI Issues an alert on Monday about state-sponsored hackers using the Kwampirs malware to attack healthcare supply chain companies and other industry sectors as part of a global hacking campaign just as the pandemic takes hold across…

https://acenewsservices.com/2020/04/01/washington-just-in-fbi-issues-an-alert-on-monday-about-state-sponsored-hackers-using-the-kwampirs-malware-to-attack-healthcare-supply-chain-companies-and-other-industry-sectors-as-part-of-a-global/

This time around, the FBI highlighted that some of the group’s targets are organisations in the healthcare industry, currently grappling with the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak: Besides sending out a PIN (Private Industry Notification), the FBI has also published two Flash alerts, one containing YARA rules to identify the group’s Kwampirs malware on infected networks, and the second containing a technical report, complete with IOCs (indicators of compromise).

Finding North from unclear sky around September.

Finding North from unclear sky around September.

by tonytran2015 (Melbourne, Australia).

Click here for a full, up to date ORIGINAL ARTICLE and to help fighting the stealing of readers’ traffic.

(Blog No. 168).

#find North, #finding North, #direction, #by stars, #Altair, #Fomalhaut, #September, #unclear sky,

Finding North from unclear sky around September.

Around September there are some bright stars shining the whole night. They include Deneb close to the Celestial North pole and Fomalhaut in the Southern sky. These stars can be used to locate the Celestial poles in the sky and subsequently the terrestrial principal directions.

1. Celestial poles and terrestrial directions.

Sun on Celestial Sphere

Figure: The Sun, the Moon and the stars are attached to a Celestial sphere which encloses the Earth like a giant rotating cage.

To an Earth bound observer, the Earth appears to be enclosed by a large rotating spherical shell called the Celestial Sphere with all stars attached to it. This shell rotates around the Earth nearly one revolution every 24 hous. This rotation leaves unmoved only 2 points on the shell. They are called the Northern and Southern Celestial poles of the Celestial Sphere.

If an observer can locate one Celestial pole then the projection to the ground of the line from him to the pole will be along his terrestrial North South direction.

2. Locating the Northern Celestial Pole in Northern hemisphere.

Figure: Polar Inversion map for the Northern Celestial hemisphere. The map should be read with its September marking on its rim pointing towards the ground as illustrated here.
An observer has to align the polar map with marking for September on the rim (at 6 o’clock position) pointing downward. An observer in Northern latitude above 30 degrees will see the rotation of bright stars Vega, Deneb [1], Cassiopeia constellation, bright star Capella then Big Dipper constellations in that order.

Cassiopeia goes highest around 01am.

The bisector of the M shaped Cassiopeia goes through the Northern Celestial pole. The Northern Celestial pole is almost 30 degree below Cassiopeia.

Sky map Northern 3/4 sphere

Figure 2: Polar Inversion map of Northern Celestial 3/4 sphere.

3. Locating the Southern Celestial pole in Southern hemisphere.

Figure: Polar Inversion map for the Southern Celestial hemisphere. The map should be read with its September marking on its rim pointing towards the ground as illustrated here.

Sky map Southern 3/4 sphere

Figure: Polar Inversion map of Southern Celestial 3/4 sphere.

An observer has to align the polar map with marking for September on the rim pointing downward as illustrated here. An observer in Southern hemisphere or on the tropical zone would see Achernar [1] rising highest around 2am. Southern Celestial pole is the midpoint of Achernar and the two Pointers and is about 30 degree from Achernar.

 

4. Locating the Celestial poles from tropical stars.

A observer in the tropic should already know the two brightest stars Scorpius Antares (at the heart) and Scorpius Shaula (at the stinger end) of the Scorpius [1]. The straight line from Antares to Shaula goes through the bright star Fomalhaut which is of 60 degree distances from both Scorpius Shaula and Altair [1] which is a star of July and is close to the Celestial equator.

Figure 2: The Mercator map of the sky for inhabitants of Tropical Zone. North direction is on its top. 24hr of R.A. is near the center and R.A. increases towards the left (East) of the map. The map is to be read South side up in the Southern hemisphere.

Figure: Fomalhaut and its nearby stars.

The bisector of the angle Shaula, Altair, Fomalhaut points to the Southern Celestial pole.

Southern Celestial pole is is of 90 degree distance from Altair and of equal 60 degree from both Scorpius Shaula and Fomalhaut.

5. Visibility of the stars.

Scorpius Altairs and Scorpius Shaula are stars of June that set close to midnight when viewed from tropical zone. Altair is a star of July that sets close to 02 am. Fomalhaut is visible for nearly the whole night in September.

References.

[1]. tonytran2015, Finding North from unclear sky in April, survivaltricks.wordpress.com, Finding North from unclear sky around July, posted on 2018, May 13.

[2]. tonytran2015, Finding North from unclear sky in April, survivaltricks.wordpress.com, Finding North from unclear sky around April, posted on 2018, April 12.

[3]. tonytran2015, Finding North from unclear sky around New Year, survivaltricks.wordpress.com, Finding North from unclear sky around New Year, posted on 2018, April 05.

[4]. tonytran2015, Finding North and time by stars, survivaltricks.wordpress.com, Finding North and time by stars, posted on August 28, 2015

[5]. , posted on

[6]. The Orion constellation., posted December 26, 2016

[7].The Scorpius constellation., posted January 8, 2017

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Finding North from unclear sky around July.

Finding North from unclear sky around July.

by tonytran2015 (Melbourne, Australia).

Click here for a full, up to date ORIGINAL ARTICLE and to help fighting the stealing of readers’ traffic.

(Blog No.130).

#find North, #finding North, #direction, #by stars, #Vega, #Deneb, #Altair, #July, #unclear sky

Around July there are some bright stars shining the whole night. They include Vega, Altair and Deneb. These three stars can be used to locate the Celestial poles in the sky and subsequently the terrestrial principal directions.

1. Celestial poles and terrestrial directions.

Sun on Celestial Sphere

Figure: The Sun, the Moon and the stars are attached to a Celestial sphere which encloses the Earth like a giant rotating cage.
To an Earth bound observer, the Earth appears to be enclosed by a large rotating spherical shell called the Celestial Sphere with all stars attached to it. This shell rotates around the Earth nearly one revolution every 24 hous. This rotation leaves unmoved only 2 points on the shell. They are called the Northern and Southern Celestial poles of the Celestial Sphere.

If an observer can locate one Celestial pole then the projection to the ground of the line from him to the pole will be along his terrestrial North South direction.

2. Locating the Northern Celestial Pole in Northern hemisphere.

Figure: Polar Inversion map for the Northern Celestial hemisphere. The map should be read with its July marking (at 4 o’clock position) on its rim pointing towards the ground.
An observer has to align the polar map with marking for July on the rim (at 4 o’clock position) pointing downward. An observer in Northern latitude above 30 degrees will see the rotation of three bright stars Vega, Deneb, Capella then Big Dipper constellations in that order.

Vega and Deneb go highest around 24 hr.

The bisector of the line Vega Deneb goes through the Northern Celestial pole. The pole is almost of equal distances of 45 degrees from each of them.

3. Locating the Southern Celestial pole in Southern hemisphere.

Figure: Polar Inversion map for the Northern Celestial hemisphere. The map should be read with its July marking (at 8 o’clock position) on its rim pointing towards the ground.
An observer has to align the polar map with marking for July on the rim (at 8 o’clock position) pointing downward. An observer in Southern hemisphere or on the tropical zone would see the Southern Cross Pointers highest around 18 hr, then Antares around 20 hr. Achernar is seen rising before Sunrise. The midpoint between the Pointers and Achernar is almost the Southern Celestial pole.

4. Locating the Celestial poles from tropical stars.

A observer in the tropic should already know the very bright star Bootes and the bright star Antares in the Scorpius constellation used in April.

Figure 1: Photograph of Spica (near the bottom edge), Bootes Arcturus (near the right edge) and Antares (1/8 of the width from the left edge) forming a triangle. Celestial North is at 01 o’clock position (30 degree clockwise from vertical) in this photo. There is a very bright planet (1/2 from left edge, 1/3 from bottom) traveling on the Ecliptic in this photo.

Figure 2: The Mercator map of the sky for inhabitants of Tropical Zone. North direction is on its top. 24hr of R.A. is near the center and R.A. increases towards the left (East) of the map. The map is to be read South side up in the Southern hemisphere.

On the trailing side of Bootes Arcturus and Antares, (click the above Mercator map for details) there is a bright star of equal distances of 60 degrees to both of them. This star is Altair, which is as bright as Antares.

Following the line Antares to Bootes Arcturus, turning anti-clockwise by 90 degrees at Bootes Arcturus and traveling for 60 degrees takes us to Vega, which is as bright as Bootes Arcturus. The line (Antares, Arcturus) is nearly at right angle to the almost straight line (Spica, Arcturus, Vega).

The line (Bootes Arcturus, Antares) is nearly parallel to the line (Vega, Altair) which lie slightly nearer to Bootes Arcturus.

Vega is as bright as Bootes Arcturus while Altair is as bright as Antares.

Sky map Northern 3/4 sphere

Figure 3: Polar Inversion map of Northern Celestial 3/4 sphere. The line (Vega, Altair) is 30 degrees long and is nearly parallel to the line (Bootes Arcturus, Antares) which is 60 degrees long.

Rotate the line (Altair, Vega) about Altair by 10 degrees counter-clockwise give the great circle through the two Celestial poles. Northern Celestial pole is nearer to Vega and is 80 degrees from Altair. Southern Celestial pole is nearer to Altair and is 100 degrees from Altair.

Trailing 2 hour behind Vega is the bright star Deneb (see the Mercator star-map). (Vega, Altair, Deneb) is known as the Summer Triangle. The bisector of the angle Vega, Altair, Deneb points to the Northern Celestial pole.

Bright Stars 20 Plus 2

Figure 4: Table of 20 brightest +2 stars in order of appearance.

5. Visibility of the stars.

Altair is visible for nearly the whole night in July. The Summer Triangle is visible for nearly the whole night in July. Click on the Mercator map for details.

6. CAUTION with planets
The Moon and planets travel on the Ecliptic. Observers should take care not to mistake any planet for Antares in the Scorpius constellation.
A planet is always brighter than any star, including Sirius, moves from night to night, and does not twinkle in clear sky.

References.

[1]. tonytran2015, Finding North from unclear sky in April, survivaltricks.wordpress.com, Finding North from unclear sky around April, posted on 2018, April 12.

[2]. tonytran2015, Finding North from unclear sky around New Year, survivaltricks.wordpress.com, Finding North from unclear sky around New Year, posted on 2018, April 05.

[3]. tonytran2015, Finding North and time by stars, survivaltricks.wordpress.com, Finding North and time by stars, posted on August 28, 2015

[4]. , posted on

[5]. The Orion constellation., posted December 26, 2016

[6].The Scorpius constellation., posted January 8, 2017

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Caution in finding North by bisector line of a horizontal watch. Posted on October 28, 2015

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Finding North from unclear sky around April.

Finding North from unclear sky around April.

by tonytran2015 (Melbourne, Australia).

Click here for a full, up to date ORIGINAL ARTICLE and to help fighting the stealing of readers’ traffic.

(Blog No.124).

#find North, #finding North, #direction, #by stars, #Spica, #Bootes Arcturus, #Antares, #April, #unclear sky
Around April there are some bright stars shining the whole night. They include Spica, Bootes Arcturus and Antares. These three stars can be used to locate the Celestial poles in the sky and subsequently the terrestrial principal directions.

1. Celestial poles and terrestrial directions.

Sun on Celestial Sphere

Figure: The Sun, the Moon and the stars are attached to a Celestial sphere which encloses the Earth like a giant rotating cage.
To an Earth bound observer, the Earth appears to be enclosed by a large rotating spherical shell called the Celestial Sphere with all stars attached to it. This shell rotates around the Earth nearly one revolution every 24 hous. This rotation leaves unmoved only 2 points on the shell. They are called the Northern and Southern Celestial poles of the Celestial Sphere.

If an observer can locate one Celestial pole then the projection to the ground of the line from him to the pole will be along his terrestrial North South direction.

2. Locating the Northern Celestial Pole in Northern hemisphere.

Figure 1: Stars in the Northern hemisphere rotates anticlockwise around the North pole.

An observer in Northern latitude above 30 degrees will see the rotation of three bright stars Vega, Deneb, Capella then Big Dipper constellations in that order.

Big Dipper constellation goes highest around 22 hr.

3. Locating the Southern Celestial pole in Southern hemisphere.

Figure 1: Stars in the sothern hemisphere rotates anticlockwise around the North pole.

An observer in Southern hemisphere or on the tropical zone would see the Southern Cross Pointers for the whole night.

4. Locating the Celestial poles from tropical stars.

Figure 1: The Mercator map of the sky for inhabitants of Tropical Zone. North direction is on its top. 24hr of R.A. is near the center and R.A. increases towards the left (East) of the map. The map is to be read South side up in the Southern hemisphere.

An Earth bound observer in Southern hemisphere or on the tropical zone can identify the forward swept broom (or a duck foot (?), a bird foot (?) or a tree with 3 upper branches (?)). formed by the brightest star Sirius and four surrounding bright stars Canopus, Orion-Rigel, Betelgeuse and Procyon. The line Canopus to Sirius make the 35 degrees long broomstick handle and three lines from Sirius to each of the other three stars form three branches of the forward swept broom head (see the star maps). Sirius to Procyon is the trailing branch of the (three branched) broom head.
Doubling the travel from Sirius to Procyon takes us to another bright star named Pollux.

Two thirds of the line from Procyon to Pollux is a point on the Ecliptic (the great circle containing the.Sun and all planets). Turning anticlockwise 100 degrees at this point and traveling by a distance of 40 degrees takes us to a less bright star Leo Regulus. Keeping the direction from that two thirds point to Leo Regulus and travel for another 50 degrees takes us to a brighter star Spica. Spica is 90 degree in distance from the that two thirds point. (Observers from the Southern Hemisphere may also see that the great circle arc going through the long axis of the Southern Cross goes by 50 degrees to get very close to Spica. Draw the line from Southern Cross to Spica and then turns 30 degrees anticlockwise and continue for another 30 degrees to reach Bootes Arcturus.)

Turning clockwise by 90 degrees at Spica to leave the Ecliptic and traveling by 30 degrees takes us to a much brighter unmistakable star Bootes Arcturus.

Instead of turning right toward Bootes Arcturus, traveling along the Ecliptic for another 50 degrees take us to a bright star Antares in the Scorpius (Observers from the Southern Hemisphere may also see that Antares is 45 degrees clockwise and 45 degrees distance from the direction of dim Pointer to bright Pointer.).

Figure: Antares is the bright star in the Scorpius constellation which has the shape of a declawed scorpion. Two bright objects on the third top of the photo are planets traveling on the Ecliptic. Northern Celestial pole is from the top left (11 o’clock) direction of the photo.

The stars Spica, Bootes Arcturus, Antares form an arrow-head pointing North.

The midpoint of the great circle arc from Spica to Bootes Arcturus is almost on the Celestial equator. Rotating this arc clockwise by 30 degrees makes its extension goes through both Celestial poles. Northern Celestial pole is 90 degrees from the midpoint and on the side of Bootes Arcturus. Southern Celestial pole is 90 degrees from the midpoint and on the side of Spica.

The internal bisector of the angle formed by (Spica, Bootes Arcturus, Antares) points to the Southern Celestial pole while its rearward extension points to the Northern Celestial pole.

Figure: Photograph of Spica (near the bottom edge), Bootes Arcturus (near the right edge) and Antares (1/8 of the width from the left edge) forming a triangle. Celestial North is at 01 o’clock position (30 degree clockwise from vertical) in this photo. There is a very bright planet (1/2 from left edge, 1/3 from bottom) traveling on the Ecliptic in this photo.

Bright Stars 20 Plus 2

Figure 2: Table of 20 brightest +2 stars in order of appearance.

5. Visibility of the stars.
Orion constellation, Sirius and its surrounding stars are visible after Sunset. Spica, Bootes Arcturus and Antares are all visible for nearly the whole night in April.

Figure 1: Azimuth and elevation angles of stars for equatorial observers.

Figure 2: Azimuth and elevation angles of stars for observers on 30 degrees North latitude.

Figure 3: Azimuth and elevation angles of stars for observers on 30 degrees South latitude.

6. CAUTION with planets
The Moon and planets travel on the Ecliptic. Observers should take care not to mistake any planet for a navigational bright star.
A planet is always brighter than any star, including Sirius, moves from night to night, and does not twinkle in clear sky.

References.

[1]. tonytran2015, Finding North from unclear sky around New Year, survivaltricks.wordpress.com, Finding North from unclear sky around New Year, posted on 2018, April 05.

[2]. tonytran2015, Finding North and time by stars, survivaltricks.wordpress.com, Finding North and time by stars, posted on August 28, 2015

[3]. , posted on

[4]. The Orion constellation., posted December 26, 2016

[5].The Scorpius constellation., posted January 8, 2017

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Finding North from unclear sky around New Year.

 

Finding North from unclear sky around New Year.

by tonytran2015 (Melbourne, Australia).

Click here for a full, up to date ORIGINAL ARTICLE and to help fighting the stealing of readers’ traffic.

(Blog No.121).

#find North, #finding North, #direction, #by stars, #Sirius, #Canopus, #Orion-Rigel, #Capella, #New Year, #unclear sky
Around New Year there are some bright stars shining the whole night. They include Sirius, Canopus, Orion-Rigel and Capella. These four stars can be used to locate the Celestial poles in the sky and subsequently the terrestrial principal directions.

1. Celestial poles and terrestrial directions.

Sun on Celestial Sphere

Figure: The Sun, the Moon and the stars are attached to a Celestial sphere which encloses the Earth like a giant rotating cage.

To an Earth bound observer, the Earth appears to be enclosed by a large rotating spherical shell called the Celestial Sphere with all stars attached to it. This shell rotates around the Earth nearly one revolution every 24 hours. This rotation leaves unmoved only 2 points on the shell. They are called the Northern and Southern Celestial poles of the Celestial Sphere.

If an observer can locate one Celestial pole then the projection to the ground of the line from him to the pole will be along his terrestrial North South direction.

2. Locating the Northern Celestial Pole.

Orion by Samsung GN2

Figure: Photo of the Orion constellation (Photo added 2018 May 09). Northern Celestial pole is from the top direction of this photo.

An Earth bound observer in Northern hemisphere or on the tropical zone can identify the Orion constellation around New Year. The front foot of the hunter represented by this constellation is the bright star Orion-Rigel. The trailing shoulder of the hunter is the bright star Betelgeuse.

The brightest star in the sky is Sirius. The great circle arc Sirius to Capella is 70 degrees long with Betelgeuse being close to its midpoint.
Extending the great circle arc Orion-Rigel to Capella to 100 degrees long bring us practically to the Celestial North pole.

star map mercatorx1p6

Figures 1a, 1b: The Mercator maps of the sky for inhabitants of Tropical Zone. North direction is on its top. 24hr of R.A. is near the center and R.A. increases towards the left (East) of the map. The map is to be read South side up in the Southern hemisphere.

3. Locating the Southern Celestial pole.

An Earth bound observer in Southern hemisphere or on the tropical zone can identify the Orion constellation around New Year. Sirius is the brightest star in the sky and it is behind the trailing foot of the hunter.
Canopus is the next brightest star within 45 degrees of Sirius. The great circle arc Sirius to Canopus is nearly 35 degrees long. Doubling this arc bring us practically to the Southern Celestial pole.

Bright Stars 20 Plus 2

Figure 2: Table of 20 brightest +2 stars in order of appearance.
4. Visibility of these four stars.
The four stars appear on the meridional line (the North South line through the zenith of the observer) near midnight of New Year.
They appear two hours earlier for each additional calendar month after that date.
Example:
In April, they appear on the meridional line at about 24 hr – (2 hr)×(4th-1st) = 18 hr. After 18 hr they slowly move to the setting (Western) side.

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The Southern Cross Pointer stars

 

The Southern Cross Pointer stars.

by tonytran2015 (Melbourne, Australia).

Click here for a full, up to date ORIGINAL ARTICLE and to help fighting the stealing of readers’ traffic.

(Blog No.111).

by tonytran2015 (Melbourne, Australia).

#find North, #finding North, #navigation, #alpha Centauri, #Agena, #Southern Cross, #pointers, #constellation, #Scorpius,

The Southern Cross Pointer Stars.

Celestial navigators who do not use declination and right ascension begin their navigation by learning the various bright, easily unmistakable constellations in the sky (There are no more than 10 to learn beginning with Orion constellation. and Scorpius constellation.). In the Southern Hemisphere, the Pointers to Southern Cross constellation are next to be learnt as they are very bright and most easy to identify.

The two Pointer stars are two very bright stars (alpha Centauri and Agena) in the Southern Celestial hemisphere. They are very useful as they help identifying nearby navigational stars and consequently finding Southern Celestial pole for navigation.

These two bright stars are circumpolar and are both 30 degrees from to the Southern Celestial pole. They are seen late night in February, all night in May, early night in September.

Inhabitants of Southern hemisphere need only to identify Alpha Centauri (brighter star of the pair), Agena (dimmer star of the pair), and Achernar in the clockwise direction (all at 60° South declination) to find the Southern Celestial pole which is at the center of the circle of 30 degrees in radius through these three stars. Achernar is almost 60 degree from the Pointers (alpha Centauri, Agena) and is opposite them across the Southern Celestial Pole.

Figure: Pointer stars pointing to the Southern Cross on a Polar Skymap for Southern hemisphere.

Extending the line alpha Centauri-Agena (from brighter to dimmer Pointer) by 8 degrees takes us to the Southern Cross Constellation. Then turning clockwise by 50 degrees and extending by an additional 50 degrees takes us to the very bright Canopus star which is nearly 40 degrees from the Southern Celestial pole.

In the opposite direction, extending the line Agena-alpha Centauri (from dimmer Pointer to brighter Pointer) by about 30 degrees takes us to the stinger tail of the large, distinctive Scorpius constellation (this line goes on for another 40 degrees to reach the bright tropical star Altair). From the direction of the line Agena-alpha Centauri (from dimmer to brighter Pointer) turn clockwise by 50 degrees and travel by about 45 degrees from alpha Centauri takes us to the moderately bright star Antares at the heart of the Scorpion.

Figure: Locating an individual star in a crowded area is easily carried out using a folded piece of cardboard: The folding line is aimed at the first known star, one cardboard flap is aligned to contain the second known star. The other flap is then opened to the required angle (marked 1) and the angle to the target star (marked 2) can be read.

2. The Southern Cross.

The Southern Cross is a useful navigational constellation. Its long axis goes through the Southern Celestial pole (which is also nearly on the bisector of the Pointer Stars and is also nearly on the line through Sirius and Canopus) in one direction and goes through the Northern Celestial pole in the opposite direction.

Turning slightly by 20 degrees anticlockwise toward the trailing’ side (Eastern side) from this direction to the Northern Celestial pole and travel by a distance of about 50 degrees from the Southern Cross takes us to the bright star Spica. Turning more anticlockwise towards the Eastern side by an additional 15 degrees from that direction and traveling an additional distance of about 30 degrees takes us next to the very bright star Bootes Arcturus (The direction from Spica to Bootes Arcturus is pointing about 25 degrees to the trailing side, Eastward, from the direction of a great circle arc toward the Northern Celestial pole.).

3. The dates of Pointers to Southern Cross.

Figure 1: The dates of Agena and alpha Centauri from the table of star dates.

The Pointer stars are seen in late night in February, all night in May, and in early night in September.

4. Taking photos of the Pointers.

Figure 1: The Pointers and Southern Cross Constellation are in the lower right quarter of this phpto taken with a Samsung Galaxy Note 2. The original photo has been digitally enhanced.

The Pointers and Southern Cross constellation are adequately bright and their photos can be taken using a smart phone such as a Samsung Galaxy Note 2 with no extra attachment.

The Pointers and 3 corner stars of the vertical Southern Cross are seen on the bottom right of the above two pictures. The dimmer fourth stars of the Southern Cross can be seen in the second photo. Antares is the bright star near the middle of the left border of the second picture. Antares and the front part of the Scorpius constellation are located near the center of the left border of the second picture (The very bright dot near the upper left corner of the picture is a planet.).

Figure 2: Photos of the Pointers and Southern Cross Constellation taken with a Samsung Galaxy Note 2. The original photos have been digitally enhanced.

The two bright Pointers are seen on the bottom right of this picture 2. The two brightest spots on the left half of this picture are two planets traveling on the Ecliptic. Antares is the bright star near the middle of the half left of this picture. Vertically above Antares is the front part of the Scorpius constellation. Vertically below Antares is the bright stinging tail of the Scorpius.

Figures 3: Photo of the Scorpius Constellation taken with a Samsung Galaxy Note 2 at the same time. The original photos have been digitally enhanced.

The Scorpius constellation just mentioned is captured in the center of the third photo. There are four brightest dots on the top of the picture. The far right and far left dots are very bright and are two planets traveling on the ecliptic. The planets on the ecliptic sometimes make confusing the identification of the stars at the front of this constellation.

References.

[1]. tonytran2015, Finding North and time by stars, survivaltricks.wordpress.com, Finding North and time by stars, posted on August 28, 2015

[2]. The Orion constellation., posted December 26, 2016

[3].The Scorpius constellation., posted January 8, 2017

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Finding North by stars for beginners

Finding North by stars for beginners.

by tonytran2015 (Melbourne, Australia).

Click here for a full, up to date ORIGINAL ARTICLE and to help fighting the stealing of readers’ traffic.

(Blog No.85).

#find North, #finding North, #by stars, #star disk, #star map, #Mercator, #beginner,

Finding North by stars for beginners.

Beginners only need to know few stars to practice finding North by stars.

1. Common viewing instructions for all beginners.

1. From the following three maps select and print the one suitable for your zone.

Sky map Northern 3/4 sphere

Figure: Sky map (Inversion type) of the Northern Celestial 3/4-sphere showing only 20 brightest stars and some constellations. 24hr of R.A. is on the top and R.A. increases in the clockwise direction.

Sky map Southern 3/4 sphere

Figure: Sky map (Inversion type) of the Southern Celestial 3/4-sphere showing only 20 brightest stars and some constellations. 24hr of R.A. is on the top and R.A. increases in the anti-clockwise direction.

star map mercatorx1p6

Figure: The Mercator map of the sky for inhabitants of Tropical Zone. North direction is on its top. 24hr of R.A. is near the center and R.A. increases towards the left (East) of the map. The map is to be read South side up in the Southern hemisphere.

2. Use a shadow stick or a compass to find out the (true) North direction at your location.

shadow stick to tell time and find North

Figure: A shadow stick for finding North and time is drawn here in blue colour. The shadow of its tip always move WEST TO EAST along a conical curve C (drawn in red). The axis of symmetry of the curve C is the terrestrial North-South direction. (Conical curve: Elliptical, parabolic or hyperbolic curve).

3. Find out the latitude of your location.

4. Find out the current date in the calendar year.

5. Use the following simplified instructions to identify the stars at mid-nights.

2. Viewing instructions for inhabitants of Polar and Temperate Zones.

1. Place one of your straightened arm horizontally, pointing to North if you are in Northern hemisphere and South if in Southern hemisphere.

2. Raise your straightened arm by an angle equal to your latitude. Your straightened arm now points to the Celestial pole at your location.

3. Hold the circular star map on the hand of that arm, with its axis pointing to the Celestial pole and the MARKING FOR CURRENT MONTH ON ITS RIM AT ITS BOTTOM.

4. You can now see the images of stars on the map pointing to the actual stars.

sky disk alignment

Figure: Aligning the center of the paper star disk to the Celestial pole in the sky to identify the stars at midnight.

5. Beginners only need to recognize the circumpolar stars for their own hemisphere.

Inhabitants of Northern hemisphere need only to identify Little Dipper, Big Dipper (11hr R.A., 60° declination) and Cassiopeia (1hr R.A., 60° declination).

Figure: Finding North by stars for beginners (Northern hemisphere).

Inhabitants of Southern hemisphere need only to identify Agena, Alpha Centauri (pointer stars) and Acherna in the anticlockwise direction (all at 60° South declination). Acherna is 60 degree from the pair (alpha Centauri, Agena) and is on the opposite side across the Southern Celestial Pole.

Figure: Finding North by stars for beginners (Southern hemisphere).

Extending the line alpha Centauri-Agena by 8 degrees gives the Southern Cross Constellation. Then turning clockwise by 50 degrees and extending by another 50 degrees gives the very bright Canopus star.

In the opposite direction, extending the line Agena-alpha Centauri by about 30 degrees gives the stinger tail of the large, distinctive Scorpius constellation.

6. The knowledge of other stars will follow naturally with time.

3. Viewing instructions for inhabitants of Tropical Zone.

1. Hold the Mercator star map above your head, with North direction pointing to true North.

2. The length of the map corresponds to 13 months. Select and view only 6 month centered on the CURRENT MONTH. The line for the current month is worked out from the markings along the vertical lines of this Mercator map.

3. You can now see the images of stars on the map pointing to the actual stars.

4. Beginners only need to recognize some bright stars near to the Celestial equator: Orion Rigel and Betelgeuse of the large, distinctive Orion constellation, Procyon, Leo Regulus, Spica, Bootes Arcturus, Altair, Antares of the large, distinctive Scorpius constellation. They are associated with various different months of the year.

Equatorial Stars2

Figures: Finding North by stars for beginners (Tropical zone). Click to enlarge figure.

5. The knowledge of other stars will follow naturally with time (see Slide Sky-Map for displaying tropical stars.).

Bright Stars 20 Plus 2

Figure 2: Table of 20 brightest +2 stars in order of appearance.

4. Common Identifying instructions.

Sun on Celestial Sphere

Figure: The Sun, the Moon and the stars are attached to a Celestial sphere which encloses the Earth like a giant rotating cage.

1. Beginners should observe the identified stars in subsequent night as well as at various different time.

2. The circumpolar stars will remain visible all year round for cold temperate zones. Beginners only need to know them well.

3. The tropical stars appear in sequences and tropical inhabitants have to associate tropical stars with their months in the year.

4. Tropical constellations are seen upright from Northern Hemisphere and upside down from Southern Hemisphere

References.

[1]. tonytran2015, Shadow-stick-navigation-and-graph-of-solar-paths, posted on August 19, 2016.

[2]. wiki, Astronomical_ceiling_of_Senemut_Tomb.

[3]. Suchow map, http://www.adlerplanetarium.org/exhibits/planetary-machines.

[4]. wiki, Chinese_star_maps

[5]. tonytran2015, Finding directions and time using the Sun and a divider, survivaltricks.wordpress.com , Finding directions and time using the Sun and a divider., posted on May 6, 2015.

[6]. tonytran2015, Finding North direction and time using the hidden Sun via the Moon, survivaltricks.wordpress.com, Finding North direction and time using the hidden Sun via the Moon . Posted on July 6, 2015.

[7]. tonytran2015, Finding North direction and time by stars, survivaltricks.wordpress.com, Finding North and time by stars. Posted on August 28, 2015

[8]. tonytran2015, Finding accurate directions using a watch, posted on May 19, 2015 .

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The Scorpius constellation

The Scorpius constellation

by tonytran2015 (Melbourne, Australia).

Click here for a full, up to date ORIGINAL ARTICLE and to help fighting the stealing of readers’ traffic.

(Blog No.45).

#find North, #finding North, #direction, #by stars, #Scorpius, #Antares, #Sagittarius, #Ara, #navigation, #constellation.

Celestial navigators who do not use declination and right ascension begin their navigation by learning the various bright, easily identifiable constellations in the sky (There are no more than 10 to learn.). The Scorpius is usually chosen to be the second constellation to be learned since it is as large as Orion and is useful when Orion is out of sight.

The Scorpius is a crowded, large Southern constellation of June. Part of it is always seen in the sky of June for the whole night, attains its highest elevation (or altitude) about midnight and is immediately South of the most Southern point of the Ecliptic. Scorpius can be seen on the rising side before sunrise in January, seen for the whole night in May and seen on the setting side after sunset in November.

It has the size of 30 degree (in angle) and has the shape of a hook oriented 55 degree clockwise from the great circle arc through the Celestial poles. Arabian sky watchers see a resembling to the body and tail of a (now declawed) scorpion and gave it the name Scorpius.

The brightest star of Scorpius is Antares but it is so close to the ecliptic that it is often outshone by the Moon and bright planets traveling on the ecliptic. Antares often requires extra care for proper identification. Identifying Antares give a good practice to star identifying.

1. The Scorpius on a Mercator sky-map.

mercator8gc30.jpg

Figure 1: The Scorpio constellation is in the shape of a hook, is close to the ecliptic and one third from the left edge of this Mercator sky-map.

Figure 2: A common Asian scorpion.

The Scorpius has too many stars and its brightest star Antares can even be over-shone by planets wandering near to it. Therefore its identification often requires additional care.

An observer in the Southern hemisphere can check that the hook shaped stinging tail of the Scorpius is just touching the great circle arc (drawn in yellow) through the two Pointers to the Southern Cross.

Figure 3: The Scorpius is seen as a hook in the top left quadrant of this Polar Inversion map of the Southern hemisphere. Its hook shaped stinging tail is just touching the great circle arc (drawn in yellow) through the two Pointers to the Southern Cross.

2. An alternative method of recognizing stars in the Scorpius

Figure 1: Scorpius Sagittarius and Ara are easily recognized together.

I found that it is easier to recognize the bright stars of three constellations Scorpius, Sagittarius and Ara together. They resemble a tree with two side roots rising at right angle from a ground line.

The two brightest stars of all three constellations are Antares and Shaula in the Scorpius.They are separated by 17 degrees in angle. They line up with two other dim stars to form a straight line (delta Scorpius, Antares, Shaula and kappa Scorpius) which is slightly longer.

The South-trailing end of this line continues to be the bisector of a right angle line formed by five stars zeta Sagittarius, Kaus Australis, Shaula, theta Scorpius, alpha Ara.

The line of two brightest stars looks like a tree sticking up at right angle to the ground line formed by dimmer stars in line with alpha and epsilon Ara. The tree has two side roots (Shaula-Kaus Australis. and Shaula-theta Scorpius-alpha Ara) originating from Shaula and each is at 45 degree from the tree trunk.

After the bright stars have been identified, each constellation can be identified using its conventional map as given in [1] and [2].

3. Taking photos of the Scorpius.

The Scorpius is adequately bright and its photos can be taken using a smart phone such as a Samsung Galaxy Note 2 with no extra attachment.

Figure 1: A photo of the Scorpius Constellation taken with a Samsung Galaxy Note 2. This photo was added on 2018Feb26 and has been digitally enhanced.

The Scorpius constellation is in the center of this picture. There are four brightest dots on the top half of this picture. The far right and far left dots are very bright and are two planets traveling on the ecliptic. The planets on the ecliptic sometimes make it hard to identify this constellation. (This added photo was taken on 2018 Feb 26).

Scorpius

Figure 2: Photo of the Scorpius Constellation taken with a Samsung Galaxy Note 2. The original photo was taken prior to 2017Jan09 and has been digitally enhanced.

Scorpius

Figure 2: Another photo of the Scorpius Constellation taken with Samsung Galaxy Note 2. The original photo was taken prior to 2017Jan09 and has been digitally enhanced. There are three bright dots in a straight line at the top of the first photo. The two on the left are two planets on the ecliptic. The third one on the right is delta Scorpius. Antares is the bright dot under the three in line.

4. Easy identification of Scorpius by a slide sky map.

starmap18april0130c.jpg

Figure 1: The Scorpius position by the Mercator slide sky map, with an altitude grid for an observer on 10 deg North (South of India, Thailand, Malaysia, South of Vietnam, the Phillipines, Central America) .

Observers who are not quite familiar with the Scorpius constellation can use the slide sky map described in reference [2] to confirm its identity. The latitude of the observer, time, and North direction are required for identification using a slide sky map. The figure here gives its altitude (elevation) and its orientation at the time of the first photo of the preceding section.

References.

[1]. tonytran2015, Finding North and time by stars in the tropics, survivaltricks.wordpress.com,Finding North and time by stars in the tropics, posted on May 25, 2016

[2]. tonytran2015, Slide Sky-Map for displaying tropical stars, survivaltricks.wordpress.com, Slide Sky-Map for displaying tropical stars., posted on October 7, 2016

[3]. tonytran2015, Finding North and time by stars, survivaltricks.wordpress.com,Finding North and time by stars, posted on August 28, 2015

[4]. The Orion constellation., posted December 26, 2016

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The Orion constellation.

​The Orion constellation

by tonytran2015 (Melbourne, Australia).

Click here for a full, up to date ORIGINAL ARTICLE and to help fighting the stealing of readers’ traffic.

(Blog No.43).

#find North, #direction, #by stars, #Orion, #Sirius, #navigation, #constellation.

Celestial navigators who do not use declination and right ascension begin their navigation by learning the various bright, easily identifiable constellations in the sky (There are no more than 10 to learn.).

The Orion is usually chosen to be the first constellation to be learned. The Orion is a bright, easily identifiable constellation of December. It stays in the sky of December for the whole night, attains its highest elevation (or altitude) about midnight and is right on the Celestial equator.
It has the size of 30 degree (in angle) and has the shape of a waisted rectangle. Western sky watchers see a resembling to man in an armor vest and gave it the name Orion. Pacific sky watchers see its two brightest diagonal stars as the ends of a large stick in the sky.

It is never blinded by the Moon or any bright planet as the ecliptic is well away from it. As it is quite bright and has easily identifiable shape, it is usually used as the base (anchor marks) to start locating other stars.

1. The Orion on a Mercator sky-map.

mercator8gc30.jpg

Figure 1: The Orion constellation is right on the Celestial Equator and one third from the right edge of this Mercator sky-map.

 



The three dim stars in a straight line starting from the waist band and almost at right angle to it (not shown in this simplified Mercator sky map) are called the Dagger stars. The Dagger is at right angle to the Celestial equator and points along a great arc in the North to South direction on the Celestial sphere.


Rigel or Beta Orionis is bright star at the South leading corner of the waisted rectangle. Betelgeuse is bright star at the North trailing corner of the waisted rectangle. Bellatrix is a less bright star on the North leading corner of the rectangle.

Rotating the line Betelgeuse – Rigel by 90 degree in the anti-clockwise direction gives the line Betelgeuse – Aldebaran, (Aldebaran is also called alpha Tauri).

Extending the line Bellatrix-Aldebaran by another 50% makes it reaches Pleiades group of stars (not shown on this simplified Mercator sky map). This group has millions of stars fitting within an area as small as the area of the Moon (The area is equal to that of a fingernail on a fully extended arm). Most people can see a brush shape made of 7 brightest stars of this group.

On the trailing side of Orion lies the brightest star in the sky. It is Sirius. Rigel -Betelgeuse – Sirius form an almost equilateral triangle on the trailing side of the line Rigel – Betelgeuse.

Betelgeuse is the star of December 20th and the December solstice occurs on the 21st of December, on the following night .

The night when the brightest star Sirius attains its highest altitude at midnight is the first night of a new (Roman) calendar year (Is it a coincidence?).

2. Taking photos of the Orion.

Orion Constellation

Figure 2: Photo of the Orion Constellation taken with a Samsung Galaxy Note 2. The original photo has been digitally enhanced. Sirius is the brightest star on the lower half. Rigel, Betelgeuse and gamma-Gemini are in line (from bottom to top) and almost equally spaced.

Figure 3: Photo of the Orion Constellation taken with a Samsung Galaxy Note 2. The original photo has been digitally enhanced. On this night there was a bright object (planet ?) on the elliptic near to the leading shoulder of Orion.

The Orion is quite bright and photo can be taken using a smart phone such as a Samsung Galaxy Note 2 with no extra attachment.

Notes: The photos have been updated in March 2018.

References.

[1]. tonytran2015, Finding North and time by stars in the tropics, survivaltricks.wordpress.com, Finding North and time by stars in the tropics, posted on May 25, 2016

[2]. tonytran2015, Slide Sky-Map for displaying tropical stars, survivaltricks.wordpress.com, Slide Sky-Map for displaying tropical stars., posted on October 7, 2016

[3]. tonytran2015, Finding North and time by stars, survivaltricks.wordpress.com, Finding North and time by stars, posted on August 28, 2015

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